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HPE 3PAR 8400 Operating System Suite - Base License

Mfg. Part: L7B69A | CDW Part: 3834944 | UNSPSC: 43233004
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Product Overview
Main Features
  • Base License
  • 1 system
The HP 3PAR StoreServ 8400 All-Flash Starter Kit is an all-flash version of the HP 3PAR StoreServ 8400 that provides all-flash acceleration at entry-level price in a 4-node scalable system. The kit includes the HP 3PAR StoreServ 8400 2-Node Storage System Base equipped with 8 x 480GB SFF cMLC SSD drives, the OS Suite, and Virtual Copy software.

Technical Specifications
Specifications are provided by the manufacturer. Refer to the manufacturer for an explanation of the print speed and other ratings.
Software
License Category: License
License Qty: 1 system
License Type: Base License

Header
Brand: HPE
Compatibility: PC
Manufacturer: HP 3Par Products
Model: 8400 Operating System Suite
Packaged Quantity: 1
Product Line: HPE 3PAR

General
Category: Software suite
Installation Type: Locally installed
Subcategory: Software suite - OS

Product Reviews
HPE 3PAR 8400 Operating System Suite - Base License is rated 4.3 out of 5 by 51.
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The ease of moving data around is beneficial. Valuable Features:The ease of moving data around is very beneficial and will become more beneficial as we get to the next level, in regards to federation. Other things that are beneficial, for one thing, the speed of it is very good for us. We are specifically buying full SSD arrays for our pure zero environment and that's giving us the speed and reliability that we need. The other thing is, migrations have been quite easy to move from older XP arrays to 3PAR. That's been a huge benefit and I don't think could've done that with any other product. It's been very easy. Yes, we've run into some little things here and there but overall, I think that's been our biggest strength with the 3PARs that we currently have.Improvements to My Organization:Again, moving data around. Speed and the fact that, once we start getting into full SSD arrays, we don't really have to worry about performance issues anymore. So, to the end consumer, which in our line of work is going to be hospitals, they're getting patient data a lot faster, so we don't have to worry about that so much. Of course cost is another benefit of it. It is cheaper for us to go with a 3PAR rather than the XP line. That was a huge reason why we went to 3PAR. Just the other benefits that we found from there, I think have really provided us very good confirmation that we made the right decision on that.Room for Improvement:The one thing I don't like so much about it is, one thing that I'm dealing with quite a bit lately is, the fact that GA releases of the code, General Availability releases, they don't feel like they're as proven as some of the other arrays that we've dealt with. When we get a GA release from another array, whether it be the XP array or the VMAX or something like that, they seem more stable. The 3PARs, when you're dealing with a GA release, they feel like they have a lot of bugs in them.We've run into those and they say that we need an upgrade, but doesn't answer my question so much because I'm sitting there going, "OK, I can upgrade but I do a major upgrade once a year." I have many, many arrays and I can't just go, "Oh yeah, we'll just upgrade this here, this here." It doesn't really work that way because I have to go through certain change control processes, I have to go and plan everything out and then I start getting into it. That's what we're about to start here next month, our annual firmware upgrades on all the arrays. I'm hitting bugs in the current firmware and it's like things become unresponsive. I haven't had a problem with an array going down, but I have had problems with getting management to that. The GA releases just don't seem to be well proven out and that's the one thing that I really wish they would improve at some point. I know I'm not the only customer that has run into that.Stability Issues:As far as stability is concerned, most times they just work. That's the thing I really like about it. We just sit there and let them run. Yeah, we've run into little things here and there but most times we're not having to go through and do any troubleshooting. In fact, since we don't do it very often, you run into the question of, "How do I do this?" Now I'm having to go back through and go, "OK, well you ran into this problem; well this is how you're going to troubleshoot it." Well, three months down the road, they may have not experienced any more performance problems and then, "Oh, now we've got something else. Let's go investigate that." It's one of those things, like it's a good and bad thing, because we are performing very, very well and we don't have to do a lot of that troubleshooting but we kind of forget how to do it, you know, over time. Honestly, that's a great strength of it. We don't have to sit there and turn the dials and switches and try to get the thing to perform just as the way we want it to. Out of the box, it pretty much performs to what we need.Scalability Issues:I have something along the lines of 65 or 70 arrays. Manageability is a big key. We're working very close with HPE trying to figure out how to manage these better because my SSMC servers are only able to handle 32 arrays at a time. I'm growing rapidly. I'm bringing in new arrays every month. I can't just do one SSMC server. In fact, what I've done is, we have different rooms per site and each one of those rooms has their own SSMC server because we need the growth. I'm sitting here with, I don't know, six or seven, maybe more than that, SSMC servers right now. It's more than that; probably 10 or so SSMC servers. So, we're obviously working with them.Technical Support:Technical support really depends. It really depends upon the person you get on the first level. Some people that I talk to are incredibly smart. They will go and start tracking down things and finding things out and I am very pleased to get those people. There are other people that I get that are just like, "Oh, well you need to do this and that." Well, I've already done all that. This reminds me of an issue I ran into not very long ago. I contacted support and they were like, "Go do this and this and this." It's like, "Well, I've actually done all of that." The problem is the fact that, because I've got a lot more experience and everything, I'm starting to hit the same knowledge level as a level two guy. So I'm sitting here going, "I've already done everything you did." I'm looking at these things in the log that I don't completely understand. Can you help me understand these. It's like, "Well, we don't; I don't know what that is or whatever," and they have to escalate it. I'm like, "OK, well, you should've probably asked for an escalation first."Don't get me wrong, there are some really, really smart people. I just run into it in the first level support sometimes where my knowledge of the situation is much more than what the level one guy is, either because I'm already in the fire or number two, I've already pretty much diagnosed it to where I need it to be and I need it to be escalated on their end.Initial Setup:The deployment's pretty easy. We have onsite services that build the array and then we go in and configure it.Implementation Team:They're coming to us on site but they're pretty much dedicated to us. They do have other companies that they help with, but since we have so many things going on, we're pretty much on a first-name basis with a lot of them, so we don't really have that problem. For us, deployment is fast. We can get an array of, if the CE's available to do it, to build it up to the point that we can take over and do our little customizations, we can easily do it in a couple of days. This is far better that what the XP arrays were. The XP arrays required a week or so of formatting. We don't have to do that formatting with the 3PARs. That is one huge thing, where we can just go: Here's another array up and running.Other Solutions Considered:I'm not going to say we're a one vendor shop, we are primarily an HPE shop. We have probably 95 percent of our stuff is HPE. We do have a little bit of EMC and that's who was in the running. I can't speak to necessarily why that decision was made, per se.From my personal experience between EMC and 3PAR, 3PAR's a little bit easier to manage in my aspect. It also seems to be somewhat a little bit more reliable. It has those features that you need to do some of the things such as mobility, whereas, on the EMC side, you have the XtremIO, which is all SSD; very, very fast. I don't know about reliability because I've not used it that much. In order to get the mobility out of it, you have to put a VPLEX in front of it which adds latency onto your transactions. It also adds a layer of complexity and it chews up a ton of SAN ports. With the 3PAR, we can put all that in, in a smaller SAN factor, not use so many SAN ports and we get all of that in basically a one-bundle thing. Plus, the vast majority of what we're deploying is 3PAR, so we don't need more than that. Going on the EMC route just doesn't make a lot of sense to us. It's a business decision way above my head, but from my perspective, and I think from other engineers' perspectives, since the decision was made to stay with HPE on a lot of things, it just makes more sense to us to do it that way.Other Advice:There's enough bugs in it and there are a few things that I wish were a little different, and I can go into that a little bit, but from there, I feel that compared to other vendors that I've worked with, it is very easy. That's the one thing that I really like. It's not, I can easily write up some sort of work instruction and go ahead and do it this way and they'll follow it and it works. That's the thing that I think any store or any storage array really needs. It needs to just work. Yes, when you have problems with it, it has problems but overall, I want it to be easy, I want it to be fast and I want it to work.I don't have a whole lot of experience with other products and I think that's kind of where things would have to lie; they would have to do a head-to-head battle between two different places. For me, the ease of provisioning to servers and that sort of thing is one of the key parts. The other is that the features that are involved in it, being able to do snapshots which we don't actually do yet, snapshots and replication, that sort of thing straight out of the box. The ease of doing that, the manageability of it, is what would lean me to doing more 3PAR than it would be another vendor. But again, you'd have to do a head-to-head battle with it. Of course, price is going to be another big key to that, too.Disclaimer: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Date published: 2017-05-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The ease of moving data around is beneficial. Valuable Features:The ease of moving data around is very beneficial and will become more beneficial as we get to the next level, in regards to federation. Other things that are beneficial, for one thing, the speed of it is very good for us. We are specifically buying full SSD arrays for our pure zero environment and that's giving us the speed and reliability that we need. The other thing is, migrations have been quite easy to move from older XP arrays to 3PAR. That's been a huge benefit and I don't think could've done that with any other product. It's been very easy. Yes, we've run into some little things here and there but overall, I think that's been our biggest strength with the 3PARs that we currently have.Improvements to My Organization:Again, moving data around. Speed and the fact that, once we start getting into full SSD arrays, we don't really have to worry about performance issues anymore. So, to the end consumer, which in our line of work is going to be hospitals, they're getting patient data a lot faster, so we don't have to worry about that so much. Of course cost is another benefit of it. It is cheaper for us to go with a 3PAR rather than the XP line. That was a huge reason why we went to 3PAR. Just the other benefits that we found from there, I think have really provided us very good confirmation that we made the right decision on that.Room for Improvement:The one thing I don't like so much about it is, one thing that I'm dealing with quite a bit lately is, the fact that GA releases of the code, General Availability releases, they don't feel like they're as proven as some of the other arrays that we've dealt with. When we get a GA release from another array, whether it be the XP array or the VMAX or something like that, they seem more stable. The 3PARs, when you're dealing with a GA release, they feel like they have a lot of bugs in them.We've run into those and they say that we need an upgrade, but doesn't answer my question so much because I'm sitting there going, "OK, I can upgrade but I do a major upgrade once a year." I have many, many arrays and I can't just go, "Oh yeah, we'll just upgrade this here, this here." It doesn't really work that way because I have to go through certain change control processes, I have to go and plan everything out and then I start getting into it. That's what we're about to start here next month, our annual firmware upgrades on all the arrays. I'm hitting bugs in the current firmware and it's like things become unresponsive. I haven't had a problem with an array going down, but I have had problems with getting management to that. The GA releases just don't seem to be well proven out and that's the one thing that I really wish they would improve at some point. I know I'm not the only customer that has run into that.Stability Issues:As far as stability is concerned, most times they just work. That's the thing I really like about it. We just sit there and let them run. Yeah, we've run into little things here and there but most times we're not having to go through and do any troubleshooting. In fact, since we don't do it very often, you run into the question of, "How do I do this?" Now I'm having to go back through and go, "OK, well you ran into this problem; well this is how you're going to troubleshoot it." Well, three months down the road, they may have not experienced any more performance problems and then, "Oh, now we've got something else. Let's go investigate that." It's one of those things, like it's a good and bad thing, because we are performing very, very well and we don't have to do a lot of that troubleshooting but we kind of forget how to do it, you know, over time. Honestly, that's a great strength of it. We don't have to sit there and turn the dials and switches and try to get the thing to perform just as the way we want it to. Out of the box, it pretty much performs to what we need.Scalability Issues:I have something along the lines of 65 or 70 arrays. Manageability is a big key. We're working very close with HPE trying to figure out how to manage these better because my SSMC servers are only able to handle 32 arrays at a time. I'm growing rapidly. I'm bringing in new arrays every month. I can't just do one SSMC server. In fact, what I've done is, we have different rooms per site and each one of those rooms has their own SSMC server because we need the growth. I'm sitting here with, I don't know, six or seven, maybe more than that, SSMC servers right now. It's more than that; probably 10 or so SSMC servers. So, we're obviously working with them.Technical Support:Technical support really depends. It really depends upon the person you get on the first level. Some people that I talk to are incredibly smart. They will go and start tracking down things and finding things out and I am very pleased to get those people. There are other people that I get that are just like, "Oh, well you need to do this and that." Well, I've already done all that. This reminds me of an issue I ran into not very long ago. I contacted support and they were like, "Go do this and this and this." It's like, "Well, I've actually done all of that." The problem is the fact that, because I've got a lot more experience and everything, I'm starting to hit the same knowledge level as a level two guy. So I'm sitting here going, "I've already done everything you did." I'm looking at these things in the log that I don't completely understand. Can you help me understand these. It's like, "Well, we don't; I don't know what that is or whatever," and they have to escalate it. I'm like, "OK, well, you should've probably asked for an escalation first."Don't get me wrong, there are some really, really smart people. I just run into it in the first level support sometimes where my knowledge of the situation is much more than what the level one guy is, either because I'm already in the fire or number two, I've already pretty much diagnosed it to where I need it to be and I need it to be escalated on their end.Initial Setup:The deployment's pretty easy. We have onsite services that build the array and then we go in and configure it.Implementation Team:They're coming to us on site but they're pretty much dedicated to us. They do have other companies that they help with, but since we have so many things going on, we're pretty much on a first-name basis with a lot of them, so we don't really have that problem. For us, deployment is fast. We can get an array of, if the CE's available to do it, to build it up to the point that we can take over and do our little customizations, we can easily do it in a couple of days. This is far better that what the XP arrays were. The XP arrays required a week or so of formatting. We don't have to do that formatting with the 3PARs. That is one huge thing, where we can just go: Here's another array up and running.Other Solutions Considered:I'm not going to say we're a one vendor shop, we are primarily an HPE shop. We have probably 95 percent of our stuff is HPE. We do have a little bit of EMC and that's who was in the running. I can't speak to necessarily why that decision was made, per se.From my personal experience between EMC and 3PAR, 3PAR's a little bit easier to manage in my aspect. It also seems to be somewhat a little bit more reliable. It has those features that you need to do some of the things such as mobility, whereas, on the EMC side, you have the XtremIO, which is all SSD; very, very fast. I don't know about reliability because I've not used it that much. In order to get the mobility out of it, you have to put a VPLEX in front of it which adds latency onto your transactions. It also adds a layer of complexity and it chews up a ton of SAN ports. With the 3PAR, we can put all that in, in a smaller SAN factor, not use so many SAN ports and we get all of that in basically a one-bundle thing. Plus, the vast majority of what we're deploying is 3PAR, so we don't need more than that. Going on the EMC route just doesn't make a lot of sense to us. It's a business decision way above my head, but from my perspective, and I think from other engineers' perspectives, since the decision was made to stay with HPE on a lot of things, it just makes more sense to us to do it that way.Other Advice:There's enough bugs in it and there are a few things that I wish were a little different, and I can go into that a little bit, but from there, I feel that compared to other vendors that I've worked with, it is very easy. That's the one thing that I really like. It's not, I can easily write up some sort of work instruction and go ahead and do it this way and they'll follow it and it works. That's the thing that I think any store or any storage array really needs. It needs to just work. Yes, when you have problems with it, it has problems but overall, I want it to be easy, I want it to be fast and I want it to work.I don't have a whole lot of experience with other products and I think that's kind of where things would have to lie; they would have to do a head-to-head battle between two different places. For me, the ease of provisioning to servers and that sort of thing is one of the key parts. The other is that the features that are involved in it, being able to do snapshots which we don't actually do yet, snapshots and replication, that sort of thing straight out of the box. The ease of doing that, the manageability of it, is what would lean me to doing more 3PAR than it would be another vendor. But again, you'd have to do a head-to-head battle with it. Of course, price is going to be another big key to that, too.Disclaimer: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Date published: 2017-05-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The most valuable feature is the way they've taken into consideration the tiered storage aspect of it. Valuable Features:The most valuable feature is definitely the way they've taken into consideration the tiered storage aspect of it. They've added a newer gen now; they were adding the faster A6 and whatnot to accommodate more workloads. That's been really great for us. The tiered storage solution they used was a lot more beneficial for our company. We have a lot of data storage that's just cold storage but it conveniently pulled back into a SSD, as well, so that helped us quite a bit.Improvements to My Organization:With 3PAR, we got more insights. We could see where data is going; overall better performance as well from that standpoint. For the ProLiant servers, I don't know what to say about the series. I rack them and throw them in there. Once you put them on a rack, as long as you don't mess with it, they just run.Stability Issues:We haven't overly stressed it to say whether there's any stability. Once we expand it and do any replication, that's where we're going to see the stability but on basic operation of 3PAR, it's stable. You would expect that there's no quirkiness. I'm not seeing glitches in the UI, I'm not seeing too much in there.Technical Support:The technical support leaves a lot to be desired. I find it amazing that I paid for extra for support for the 3PAR and I wait on the phone for 30 minutes. For that extra support, when I'm paying for the premium support; so it's US-side support, US-based support, I should mention. If I call the regular number without the extra support, I talk to someone instantly.It's, "What care plan are you on? What care plan are you on?" That's the question of HPE, "Are you on the SA plan?" "Are you on this plan?" You got to dig through this matrix of plans to figure out which phone are we going to call. It's absurd.Initial Setup:The initial setup was pretty straightforward. The only complexity we've really had for the initial setup was actually with HPE, in scheduling. We have to have an HPE person on site to put the 3PAR in so they can vet it and all that stuff. Getting him coordinated, it was a wreck. The first time.Other Solutions Considered:We did look at EMC instead of 3PAR for a little bit. We chose 3PAR because I've dealt with LeftHand before. Then, HPE bought LeftHand, namely 3PAR. I dealt with their storage stuff previously a little bit. I like what they were doing and how they were doing it.It was just one of those things. I knew it. I was comfortable with it but it wasn't necessarily a front-runner until we started looking at EMC and just how convoluted their solution was to get there. The price at EMC was expensive. We had all these tertiary software you had to purchase just to get to run normally. There's still that with the 3PAR but it wasn't as steep of a cost. I wasn't paying for this huge EMC name.Disclaimer: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Date published: 2017-05-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The most valuable feature is the way they've taken into consideration the tiered storage aspect of it. Valuable Features:The most valuable feature is definitely the way they've taken into consideration the tiered storage aspect of it. They've added a newer gen now; they were adding the faster A6 and whatnot to accommodate more workloads. That's been really great for us. The tiered storage solution they used was a lot more beneficial for our company. We have a lot of data storage that's just cold storage but it conveniently pulled back into a SSD, as well, so that helped us quite a bit.Improvements to My Organization:With 3PAR, we got more insights. We could see where data is going; overall better performance as well from that standpoint. For the ProLiant servers, I don't know what to say about the series. I rack them and throw them in there. Once you put them on a rack, as long as you don't mess with it, they just run.Stability Issues:We haven't overly stressed it to say whether there's any stability. Once we expand it and do any replication, that's where we're going to see the stability but on basic operation of 3PAR, it's stable. You would expect that there's no quirkiness. I'm not seeing glitches in the UI, I'm not seeing too much in there.Technical Support:The technical support leaves a lot to be desired. I find it amazing that I paid for extra for support for the 3PAR and I wait on the phone for 30 minutes. For that extra support, when I'm paying for the premium support; so it's US-side support, US-based support, I should mention. If I call the regular number without the extra support, I talk to someone instantly.It's, "What care plan are you on? What care plan are you on?" That's the question of HPE, "Are you on the SA plan?" "Are you on this plan?" You got to dig through this matrix of plans to figure out which phone are we going to call. It's absurd.Initial Setup:The initial setup was pretty straightforward. The only complexity we've really had for the initial setup was actually with HPE, in scheduling. We have to have an HPE person on site to put the 3PAR in so they can vet it and all that stuff. Getting him coordinated, it was a wreck. The first time.Other Solutions Considered:We did look at EMC instead of 3PAR for a little bit. We chose 3PAR because I've dealt with LeftHand before. Then, HPE bought LeftHand, namely 3PAR. I dealt with their storage stuff previously a little bit. I like what they were doing and how they were doing it.It was just one of those things. I knew it. I was comfortable with it but it wasn't necessarily a front-runner until we started looking at EMC and just how convoluted their solution was to get there. The price at EMC was expensive. We had all these tertiary software you had to purchase just to get to run normally. There's still that with the 3PAR but it wasn't as steep of a cost. I wasn't paying for this huge EMC name.Disclaimer: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Date published: 2017-05-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Allows for configuration and use of disks that help us to define both disk performance and availability. Valuable Features:All Flash Only* Designed as only flash with the xx50 designation. This array was never intended for spinning disk or hybrid use.* We have never seen a disk or other hardware failure in over two years.* Average latency is less than one millisecond.* 3PAR ASIC is the heart of the processing power built into 3PAR arrays and it is built specifically for its role.Common Provisioning Groups (CPGs)* CPGs allow for versatile, yet powerful configuration and use of disks that help us to define both disk performance and availability.* There is no need to pre-carve space. It auto-grows and distributes as it is defined. Factor in wide striping, the fact that this is all flash, and the performance and reliability are even better than the other models of 3PAR.Data Reduction Services* The 3PAR and the ASIC really help the CPG to leverage an increase in performance as well as data efficiency.* Dedupe is applied to all items inside a CPG. There is no need to manually configure per volume.* Features are all inline and there is no post-processing window. The ASIC really shines on faster write speeds with the Zero Detect Algorithm. All zeros are ignored, resulting in much faster writes, not just space savings for blank data.* Thin provisioning* Thin clonesNative Veeam Support: Provides ease of use for backing up and restoring with the additional integration with Veeam.VMWare 6.x Vol SupportVMWare Fibre Channel: Reference platform for v6.Scale up, or out: It does both on demand unlike other arrays that leave you stuck with a single alternative. 3PAR Active Mesh Architecture is quite robust.Improvements to My Organization:We were quite hesitant on the array size when it was pitched as our replacement of an aged SAN.We were guaranteed we would get much more space than the physical capacity. (Make sure you get it in writing.)In reality, their safe numbers were extremely safe.We were expecting 2:1 as a rule of thumb, but in reality, we ended up sitting at greater than 8:1 across the entire array with all compaction/reduction features factored in.Room for Improvement:I would really love to see HPE add some cloud analytics. So many other vendors are offering this, and it’s really needed for the HPE 3PAR arsenal.Use of Solution:I have used the product for over two years.Stability Issues:We have not encountered any stability issues. Its performance and capacity have been even better than expected.The code updates have been exceptionally smooth compared to our previous SAN vendor. This includes no outage windows and really short upgrade durations.Scalability Issues:We have not encountered any scalability issues. This device can scale both up and out. It is exceptionally versatile.Technical Support:I recommend that you always procure the higher support offering with an enterprise product. It will pay for itself.We went with Proactive Care Advanced, before HPE was offering Datacenter care.The Advanced Care provides proactive interoperability reports from a dedicated technical account manager. They provide further recommendations on your current configuration if it is not compliant with HPE best practices.Previous Solutions:Our previous solution was retired due to capacity and performance issues.HPE really addressed our issues with their recommendation of the 3PAR 7450 for our specific needs.It’s actually less expensive per Gigabyte than a conventional array when looking at the true cost of ownership. Not to mention the performance is six times greater than the competitor’s device.Initial Setup:The entire setup, from rack and stack, to configuring the array, was shockingly expeditious.It took longer to rezone my fibre switches than it did to get the Common Provisioning Group (CPG) configured and begin storage with vMotion VMs.Cost and Licensing Advice:Remember, you are charged per disk with a 3PAR array for licensing. Make note of this when considering future capacity. A smaller number of higher capacity SSDs can be less expensive than multiple smaller capacity disks.Other Solutions Considered:We evaluated EMC, Nimble, IBM, NetApp, and Pure Storage.Other Advice:* Make sure that you are trained on the nuances of 3PAR technology if you select this Storage Area Network.* There are many useful features and you need to leverage them to lower the total ownership cost while easing the management of the device.Disclaimer: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Date published: 2017-03-29
Rated 4 out of 5 by from The most valuable feature is its tiered approach to data structuring. We can quickly move data from slow disks to faster disks. Valuable Features:The most valuable feature is its tiered approach to data structuring. We can quickly move data that's stored on slow disks to faster disks if the demand arises. That's good value for our company.Improvements to My Organization:We've recently embarked on a large-scale convergence project where we've consolidated about 250 physical servers to virtual servers. Those virtual servers are hosted onto 3PARs 7400 systems, which are located in two data centers. They give us high availability and real-time access to data in both locations. In terms of the value for business and the value for us, it's given us the facility to have a business continuity plan, which we never had before.Room for Improvement:Data de-duplication is something that's lacking in 3PAR. We use HPE StoreOnce systems as part of a backup solution. StoreOnce systems, they use a SAS disks, which are spin disks. They have about 80% de-duplication ratio, which from a backup perspective, that gives us tremendous capacity to back up to disk; not to take to disk for 12, 24 months. When you compare that to 3PAR, 3PAR doesn't have de-duplication and this causes storage issues.Technically that's not true. 3PAR has de-duplication on the SSD drives, but because it's a mixed drive chassis, the large proportion of data that we have comes in the first class of the SAS disks, which will equate to maybe about 70 or 80% for top data. They're not de-duplicated. I think that's a feature that HPE need to work on quickly.Stability Issues:3PARs are very stable. We've been using 3PARs both in the UK and our headquarters in France for maybe four years now and we've not had any issues with the system, so they're a quite a reliable system.Scalability Issues:Scalability depends on the situation. Whenever you try and provision these converged platforms, you've got to have an element of planning in terms of where your business is going grow for the next two or three years. It's interesting. We planned for 20% data growth on a 3PAR infrastructure over three years. What we found was we had closer to 20% data growth per year.So if you look it from a data scaling perspective, we've reached the limits of our 3PAR 7200s in Europe. Thankfully for us, we've got 7400s, which gives you a lot more scalability in terms of storage. From a memory and processing prospective, they're perfect. So we have no issues with scalability.Technical Support:Technical support is very good for the 3PARs you get. We've bought a 5-year support plan and we get to speak to the 3PAR technical support team in Houston, Tx. They're quite responsive. The 3PAR support plan, as well, is a reactive support plan, so we've got people from Houston who are looking at our systems and they inform us whenever a disk is filled. They send disks to be swapped out. They can be swapped out by our team or they can be swapped out by an HP person that turns up and does the job for you.Previous Solutions:We're a large company of many, many small companies and we've realized through global projects that have an autonomous approach to IT departments, for example, where it doesn't work. That's exactly the same when it comes to the architecture behind your IT environment. We had to look at centralizing all of our systems, all of our platforms, so that we could offer a meaningful level of service to business. Without centralization, we couldn't guarantee the service of any of our platforms around the key business applications that the business expected us to deploy. That's how we knew to centralize all of our systems and platforms and host them on converged systems.Initial Setup:Initial setup was very complex. These systems are very complex, but if you buy a converged system from HPE, the converged system is part of the package and HPE provides you with the technical expertise to come out and build the converged systems for you. They're built and tested at the manufacturing plant. You can go and visit the manufacturing plant and see them if you want. Some people can. Then they're sent to your site and HPE sends experts to build the 3PARs on site and assist you with the build.Other Advice:We have a global HPE agreement and it depends on the sort of size of projects and whether or not we issue and RFP when we got to other suppliers. If we do issue an RFP, then we're not tied internally to working with HPE. We can work with whoever we think's best for the requirement. But because we have such a good close working relationship with HPE and because they attend industry events, I'm always key to recommend to some of our peers and our colleagues around the world that they should be looking at this or that particular product.3PAR's good from a medium-sized to large-sized enterprises. We're probably a large-sized enterprise company, but we have also small companies around the world where we wouldn't recommend the 3PAR for those sort of situations. We'd recommend applying a platform converged systems solution.Disclaimer: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Date published: 2016-12-31
Rated 4 out of 5 by from You can set it up and let the system tune itself. Scales better than other solutions. Valuable Features:For me, the most valuable feature is its flexibility. You don't have to pre-plan everything. With more traditional storage systems, you had to decide on the size of your RAID groups and what RAID groups you wanted. A lot of customers don't know that upfront. The nice thing about 3PAR is you can set it up and just let the system essentially tune itself.Improvements to My Organization:Since 3PAR is self tuning and it optimizes itself to a better level of performance, then that translates to the application level and the business users can get their functions done quicker and more efficiently.Room for Improvement:I think it needs to become even more automated, especially with all this new hyper-converged functionality, which is really easy to upgrade. It should also be self-healing. The upgrade process is still quite clunky for 3PAR. It receives an alert from itself and then tells you what to do. At the moment it's not that intuitive.Use of Solution:I've been working with 3PAR for about four years now.Stability Issues:We've had very little problems with stability.Scalability Issues:It can scale as long as the customer's got the budget.Technical Support:Technical support could be better. The guys you get on the phone generally are not very knowledgeable. It can often take a while to go through several levels of support to get to the solution.Initial Setup:Initial setup is relatively complex.Cost and Licensing Advice:I think the license structure is quite transparent and fair.Other Advice:I'd say are the main two qualities vendor must have is good product and good technical support. Obviously, they must also have a reasonable price.3PAR is reliable. Although it takes a little bit of time to get set up, once you get set up, it runs itself. The other nice thing about it is that, the 3PAR scales from small to large nicely. Not like other vendors where you have to have several solutions for different size environments.Disclaimer: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer:
Date published: 2016-12-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Speed, capacity, and deduplication in a stable HA solution. Valuable Features:The data deduplication is one valuable feature. Anotherthing is the fast storage possibility and the whole clustering mode. Because wehave a dual data center set-up and we wanted to have a high availabilitysolution, we chose HPE 3PAR.Improvements to My Organization:This has helped our organization with fast storage and the whole administration which is handled quite automatically. In this way, I can save one full time equivalent (FTE) a year in my team, so that alone is a great benefit.Room for Improvement:I would like to see a more stable deduplication becausewith the deduplication we have right now, the percentage that we can save isnot as high as we hoped for. The second thing I’d like to see is a morescalable and faster storage possibility without the main licenses increasing incost. Now that we are in a full flash set-up, we want to go to a set-up wherewe can use flash and slower disks. While that set-up possibility exists, thereis a whole license step-up that has to be done. It takes too long to do all thelicenses. The license and the flexibility towards licensing needs improvement.Stability Issues:The stability, “knock on wood”, is okay. My feeling is that this solution is rock solid stable.Scalability Issues:We are on the verge of the next step up. We implemented last year and now we are going to double the capacity. Based on how it’s going so far, it will be an easy step up.Technical Support:We rely on our partner for technical support. They have a direct connection with HPE for the support. So, at the moment, we have no issues.Previous Solutions:Before we were using the EVA solution and HPE LeftHand. We had a large IOPS problems with our ERP system. They weren’t stable enough and they did not have a proven record for us. Our ERP system has a large database, lots of IOPS, and these solutions couldn’t handle it. That was why we changed to HPE 3PAR that has a full SSD solution that could handle the IOPS. The main competitor was NetApp. We chose HPE because of the stability. We know HPE, we have a multi-year contract with them. We looked at several reference cases and those convinced us to choose this solution.Other Advice:When looking for a vendor, stability and a proven track record are the things to look for. I would absolutely recommend it. When you need fast storage, high capacity, and deduplication, it's a good solution.Disclaimer: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Date published: 2016-12-18
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